Sports Idioms Used in Business English

Sports and business have a lot in common. They both take hard work, are very competitive, and can lead to big successes or failures. It is not surprising that many sports idioms are used in daily American culture and also in business.

An idiom is an expression that is not literal. Therefore, if you don’t know the idiom, it may be hard to understand what someone meant. Studying idioms is an important part of becoming fluent in English.

Here are a couple examples:

1. Front runner

front runner.jpg

The front runner (as you may be able to guess) is the athlete who is in the lead during a race. This person is in front, but hasn’t won yet. A front runner means the favorite or the person who is considered most likely to get or win something.

“I’ve applied for that new management position. Do you think I will get the job?”

“Between you and me, your chances are very good. You are the front runner. Tim applied, too, but he doesn’t have a chance.”

2. The ball is in your court

court.jpg

In tennis, when the ball is on your side of the court, it is your turn to hit the ball. This is used to mean that it is someone’s turn to take action or make the next move.

“Google wants to buy the app I developed and they will pay me a lot of money. But I think if I keep it, I may be able to make even more money later on. Do you have any advice?”

“I don’t know, Tim. The ball is totally in your court on this one!”

A Few Valentine’s Day (Love) Idioms

The holiday of Valentine’s Day has its first origins going back at least 1,500 years. Originally the holiday honored one or two Catholic saints named Valentine. Today, however, the holiday is associated with romantic love and is celebrated in many countries. (In the US, like the rest of the world, it is not an official federal or state holiday where many people have the day off work.) The holiday is traditionally celebrated on February 14 (that is my mom’s birthday and her middle name is Val!)

Unsurprisingly, there are many idioms, expressions, and phrasal verbs associated with love in English. Here are a few which might help you out, especially on Valentine’s Day!

lovin

ask out (on a date) – to ask somebody out  (or ask out somebody) is to ask them to go on a date with you, as a possible way of starting a romantic relationship with them.

Example: He is too scared to ask her out.

 

chat up – to chat up somebody (or chat somebody up) is to talk to them in a flirtatious way to show you are attracted to them, and to try and make them interested in you.

British and Australian informal English.

Example: I’ve been trying to chat him up all evening but he’s not interested.

 

cuddle up – to cuddle up with someone is to sit or lie very close them in an affectionate way.

Example: I love cuddling up with my husband.

 

eat out – to eat out  is to eat away from home, at a cafe or restaurant. Many people eat out at a restaurant on Valentine’s Day.

Example: Let’s eat out tonight. I know a very good restaurant.

fall

fall for – if you fall for someone you become very attracted to them, or fall in love with them.

Informal English.

Example: She fell for him as soon as she saw him.

 

get together – if people get together they start a romantic relationship.

Example: They got together in 2001 when they were working in Paris.

 

go out together / with – to go out with someone is to have a romantic relationship with them.

Examples:

1. Will you go out with me?

2. They have been going out together for six months.

 

live for – if you live for somebody they are the most important thing in your life.

Example: Marcus lives for his wife: he will do anything for her.

 

move in together / with – to move in together is to start living with someone – usually someone you are having a romantic relationship with.

Example: We’re moving in together in June.

 

 

pour out – if you pour out your feelings to someone you tell them everything about how you are feeling. (Also: “Pour your heart out.”)

Example: She poured out her feelings and told him how much she loved him.

 

run off with – to run off with somebody is to secretly go away with someone in order to live with them or marry them, especially when other people think this is wrong. Often used to show disapproval.

Informal English.

Example: They were only 17 years old when they ran off with each other.

 

settle down – when two people settle down together they set up a life together and perhaps get married, buy a house and start a family.

Example:

Peter and Marcia are settling down and buying a house together.

 

a heart-throb – a heart-throb is a good looking man; usually someone famous who is attractive to very many women.

Informal English

Examples:

1. In my opinion, George Clooney is a heart-throb; but Justin Bieber is not!

2. Many women think the actor Brad Pitt is a heart-throb.

 

a broken heart –  a broken heart (noun) is a feeling of great sadness and despair, especially when someone you love dies or does not love you.

Examples:

1. They broke up last week and she is broken-hearted. (broken hearted = adjective)

2. Three weeks after our grandmother died, our grandfather died of a broken heart

3. His heart is broken because she doesn’t love him anymore.

 

a heart-to-heart – a heart-to-heart talk (noun) is a completely open and honest private discussion between two people.

Example

We had a heart-to-heart talk last night to try and work out our problems.

 

wear your heart on your sleeve – if you wear your heart on your sleeve you are very open about your feelings for someone, and everyone can see how you are feeling.

loves.jpg

 

fall head over heels in love – to fall head over heels in love with someone is to fall in love with them very suddenly, and with great intensity.

Example: I met my husband at university and fell head over heels in love with him on our first date.

 

lovebirds – if two people are clearly very much in love with each other they are often called ‘the lovebirds’. Lovebirds are small parrots that are well known for showing great affection to their mates.

 

puppy love – puppy love is the love or romantic feelings felt for someone by children or young adolescents. Often used in a negative or derogatory way.

Example: It’s only puppy love. They will soon forget about it.

 

What does “A Dime a Dozen” mean?

“A dime a dozen” is a phrase which is used in reference to anything which is common and/or cheap. A dime is an American unit of money equal to ten cents (a small amount of money), and a dozen means twelve of something. In other words, the thing is very cheap, less than a penny each.

dimes

Examples:

“Experts in this field are a dime a dozen.” (It means experts in a certain industry were very common and/or didn’t make much money.)

“Smiles were a dime a dozen at the Thanksgiving Day Parade.” (It means smiles were very common.)

What does “the lion’s share” mean?

“The lion’s share” is an expression that means most of or the majority (but not all).

It is a somewhat formal expression suitable for workplace and academic writings and presentations.

Examples:

“The eldest son received the lion’s share of the inheritance.”

“Without a doubt, Kathleen, who has served as my advisor over these past five years, deserves the lion’s share of my gratitude.”

lion

What does “Hear it through the grapevine” mean?

If you hear something “through the grapevine” it means that you have heard a rumor about someone or something. If you use this expression, it also helps you protect the name/identity of the person who told you the rumor.

Have you heard something through the grapevine recently?

grapevine

Example:
-David: I heard it through the grapevine that you are looking for another job. Is it true?
-Bob: Wow, how did you know that? I only told a few people. But yes, it’s true. Please don’t tell anyone else.

You can also say “I heard it on the grapevine.”
A similar idiom: “A little bird told me.”

What Does “Don’t Give Up the Day Job” Mean?

Sometimes someone wants to show off a certain new skill or joke. But what if that skill is not very impressive, or the joke is not very good? Or what if it is a little impressive, but not enough for that person to really boast about? We might say to that person: “Well, don’t give up your day job.” It means, whatever you just said or did, it wasn’t good enough to be a professional!

It may sound like it is a rude comment, but actually most Americans just think it’s a slightly funny comment.

In the case of this cartoon, this spider’s joke isn’t funny enough to make the man laugh. He even says, “Don’t quit your day job.” It means, just keep being a spider. Don’t try to be a comedian because you’re not that funny!!

What does it mean to be “mad as a March hare?”

We are already into the month of March! Before you know it, the weather will be sunny and beautiful again here in Duluth, just outside the city of Atlanta, Georgia.

Next week, we also start a new session of English classes. Good things are happening!

There is an expression in English — it is not necessarily very common — but it is funny, which goes: mad as a March hare. This expression may be 500 years old or even older. In this case, mad doesn’t mean “angry.” It means, silly, crazy, wild, ridiculous. 

Now, what is a March hare? A hare is a wild animal very similar in appearance to a rabbit.

This is a hare:

In March, the weather is warming up and hares become more active socially, physically, etc.. In England, the frantic behavior of hares in the early spring led to the expression “mad as a March hare,” and we can apply this expression to a person to indicate that they are acting extremely silly, ridiculous, or insane. Someone who is mad as a March hare might look like this:

Of course, in the U.S., use of phrases and idioms is extremely common in everyday speech. So, if you have a friend who is being strange or absurd, it’s okay to ask them: “You are mad as a March hare, aren’t you?