“Just an Old, Sweet Song, Keeps Georgia on My Mind”

Not every state in the U.S. has its own official song. However, Georgia has an official State Song, and that song has an incredible history.

In 1930, Hoagy Carmichael (music) and Stuart Gorrell (lyrics) created a song  about Hoagy’s sister. Her name was “Georgia.” (Let’s not forget that before the state of Georgia, the word “Georgia” was commonly used as a woman’s name. It is a feminine form of the name “George.”) The name of the song was “Georgia on my Mind.”

In other words, Stuart Gorrell was in LOVE with Georgia Carmichael and wrote a song about how he was always thinking about her.

However, it was another man – a musical genius and legend named Ray Charles – who made the song very famous in 1960 when he recorded it. Ray Charles was born in the state of Georgia and many people actually thought he wrote the song. As a result, there has been a common belief that the song is about the STATE of Georgia, not a person named Georgia Carmichael.

For many years, Ray Charles did not perform concerts in Georgia because of the racial discrimination there. However, things improved enough that by 1979, Ray Charles began performing there again, and even sang the song “Georgia on my Mind” before the members of the Georgia General Assembly (the main legislative/governmental body in the state).

Shortly after, the General Assembly voted to make “Georgia on my Mind” the state song of Georgia. It is a beautiful song and we hope you will listen to it! Here is the original video of Ray Charles singing it to the General Assembly.

 

WHY SHOULD WE BE CONCERNED ABOUT CULTURAL DIFFERENCES WHEN WE WRITE A BUSINESS E-MAIL?

maildude

This video makes some excellent observations about differences in emails between members of different cultures. For example, business emails written by Americans might be quite a bit longer than emails from Germans or Swiss business-people. Becoming fluent in a language is not just about knowing the vocabulary and grammar, but major cultural features as well based on where the language is spoken. At CCB School in Atlanta (Duluth), Georgia, we focus on language AND culture.

WATCH HERE: http://www.videojug.com/interview/cultural-differences-in-business-e-mail-2

What is a “Snow Day?” What is “snowed in?”

snow angelToday we’ll present to you two idiomatic phrases. They both deal with snow. In southern United States (which don’t get so cold like northern states, e.g., New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts,etc.) there is still often some snow in the winter. Because the southern states don’t get a lot of snow, however, they might not spend the money on equipment to clear snow from the roads. In short, when there’s snow in the south – especially Georgia where CCB School is located – snow usually means A SNOW DAY!! And that means, NO SCHOOL!!

So far, there had not been a snow day in the Atlanta area this year, but many schools were closed today (actually, that was because of the holiday President’s Day) and more may be closed tomorrow. Many young people are anxiously watching to see if they can have some extra time away from school to play in the snow!

To be “snowed in” means that there is so much snow that people can’t leave their house. Or at the least, they cannot make it to work or really go anywhere. It is still an opportunity to play outside, throw snowballs at each other, build a snowman, and more.

Maybe even some of our students want a snow day! (No way! They are very serious about becoming experts in English and always love to come to school!) But if you are curious whether or not we have class, we always follow Gwinnett County’s decision. This information can always be found here:  http://www.wsbtv.com/school-closings/search/

Whatever happens, have a great day!