How Will You Ring In The New Year?

Happy New Year!!!

We’ve been teaching a lot of idioms & expressions that go with the wintertime.

Now we’re ready for the New Year, and that means new expressions and phrases for you to learn!

Here are some phrases & idioms relating to the New Year holiday. Want to learn more? Come visit our school.

EXPRESSION: Ring in the New Year To celebrate the beginning of the new year at midnight on December 31.

“We are planning a big party to ring in the new year.”

“How did you ring in the new year?”

10 USEFUL PHRASES
1. New Year’s Eve
the evening of the 31st of December

– What are you doing on New Year’s Eve?
– I’m going to a party with my husband.

2. New Year’s Day
the 1st of January

– I’m going to see the NHL Winter Classic (ice-hockey match) on New Year’s Day.

3. Make a resolution/ resolve to do something
make a firm decision to do something

– Are you going to make a New Year’s resolution?
– I’ve already made one. I’ve resolved to learn a hundred new words every week.

4. Fireworks
a display of coloured explosives and smoke for amusement

– The fireworks begin as the clock strikes midnight.

5. Toast
raising your glass to drink together with a group of people to honour someone or wish them happiness, good luck/health

– Let’s drink a toast! Happy New Year, everybody!

6. Raise one’s glasses
drink a toast

– Let’s raise our glasses to a Happy New Year!

7. Superstition
an irrational belief based on faith in magic or chance

– It brings good luck if a dark haired person is the first one to enter your household on New Year’s Day. (this custom is called ’First-Footing’ in Scotland)
– That’s just some old superstition. I don’t believe in it.

8. Turn over a new leaf
start again in a better/different way

– I’ll turn over a new leaf and start being nicer to people next year.

9. Punch
a drink of mixed fruit juices often spiced with wine or other alcohol, prepared in large bowls

– Who’s going to make the punch for tonight’s party?

10. Wish
express hope concerning the future

– I wish you a very Happy New Year.

“‘TIS THE SEASON”: CHRISTMAS IDIOMS JUST IN TIME!

The following list contains numerous English idioms and expressions relating to Christmas and holiday traditions. Some of them are specifically used during the holidays and some can be used any time. More info below!

Bah! Humbug!
= first used by Ebenezer Scrooge in Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol”, this is sometimes said by people who aren’t fans of Christmas when confronted with holiday well-wishers.

I’m tired of all these Christmas carolers singing at my door! Bah humbug I say!!

Christmas comes but once a year = used as an excuse for over indulgence, whether on food or on gifts, on the basis that it doesn’t happen often. 

Go ahead and have another plate of food! Christmas comes but once a year.

Deck the halls
 = decking (or decorating) one’s hall with branches from a holly tree is an old tradition; the popular carol of the same name began as a Welsh tune dating back to the 16th century

Christmas is in five days and we haven’t put up any decorations yet! It’s time to deck the halls!

It’s the thought that counts = it’s the kindness behind an act that matters, however imperfect or insignificant it may be.(Expression can be used any time of year)

Lit up like a Christmas tree = nothing to do with decorations but used to describe an intense military attack on enemy positions (Expression not actually used for Christmas)

The more the merrier = the more people or things there are, the better a given situation will be (Expression used any time of year)

There’s no time like the present = a reminder that there are things in our lives we can do and accomplish RIGHT NOW with a little hard work (Expression used any time of year)

‘Tis the season to be jolly 
= taken from a Christmas carol, this phrase serves as a reminder to put on a happy face over the festive period (‘Tis is an old method of contracting it and is, but is rarely used these days) (Expression used near and around Christmas time)

Trim the tree
 = nothing to do with cutting, this is an old reference to decorating a pine tree with ornaments, lights and other glittery bits (Expression used during Christmas time)

White Christmas = when it snows at Christmas time (something which happens sometimes in Atlanta but not often)

WINTER-TIME IDIOMS & EXPRESSIONS

It’s that time of year again here in Atlanta where the weather turns very cold and we even get some snow (usually in January or February). There are a lot of idioms in English related to the snow and winter. Below are just a few you might enjoy. If you want to learn even more, come study at our accredited ESL school!

snowball’s chance in hell – to be very unlikely to succeed at something

ex: The little boat had a snowball’s chance in hell of surviving the storm.

dead of winter – the coldest, darkest part of winter

ex: It feels like the dead of winter out there.

to be on thin ice – to be in a risky situation

ex: If you keep asking him about his ex-girlfriend, you’ll be on thin ice. He’ll probably start yelling at you.

pure as the driven snow – to be innocent and chaste (frequently used ironically)

ex: Madonna isn’t exactly pure as the driven snow, but the book she wrote is excellent!

to break the ice – to create a more friendly and relaxed atmosphere

ex: Alexandra is great at breaking the ice, she always knows what to say to people.

to run hot and cold – to be unable to make up one’s mind

ex: David’s feelings about Lisa run hot and cold; one minute he loves her, and the next, he’s bored of her.

DAILY IDIOM: “Horsing Around!” / “Quit Horsing Around!”

There are many idioms in English related to animals. To “horse around” means to play, act silly, and “goof off,” usually when you are really supposed to be doing something serious. When someone is playing at their job, sometimes we say: “Quit horsing around!”

Our English-as-a-Second-Language School in Duluth. Georgia, encourages students to study hard and play hard! So, at CCB School, you can horse around a little bit, but make sure to do your homework!

IDIOM OF THE DAY: versions of “feel up to it” or “feel up for it”

Using the phrase “up to it” or “up for it” can be used to express whether or not you want to do something.

Examples:

A: “I want to talk about our finances tonight. Do you feel up to it?”

B: “No, I’ve had a really rough day. I just don’t feel up for that.”

—–

A: “Do you feel up for going to the movies tonight?”

B: “Yes, I’d be up for that.”

Now you try using this expression with your friends!! Are you UP FOR THAT??